Gaming to Death

Here is a weird internet gaming story.  A man in southern China appears to have died of exhaustion after a three-day Internet gaming binge, state media said Monday.  The 30-year-old man fainted at a cybercafe in the city of Guangzhou on Saturday afternoon after he had been playing games online for three days, the Beijing News reported.   Paramedics tried to revive him but failed and he was declared dead at the cafe, it said.

China has 140 million Internet users, second only to the United States. It is one of the world’s biggest markets for online games, with tens of millions of players, many of whom hunker down for hours in front of computers in public Internet cafes.

Several cities have clinics to treat what Chineese psychiatrists have dubbed “Internet addiction” in users, many of them children and teenagers, who play online games or surf the web for days at a time.  They don’t eat and sometimes they even wear adult diapers or use chemical toliets so they don’t have to take breaks.   Ewwww, gross!

Weird News Shorts for this Week

Here is some really strange – odd – weird news shorts from around the world.

-A teenager has been arrested on suspicion of having posted a video of himself on YouTube driving at speeds of more than 140 mph.

Real estate billionaire Leona Helmsley left $12 million in her will for her dog Trouble but cut out two of her four grandchildren entirely.  I love that one.

-China’s Shaolin Temple, the cradle of Chinese kung fu, is demanding an apology from an Internet user who said its monks had once been beaten in unarmed combat by a Japanese ninja, Chinese media reported.

-Hungry visitors to next summer’s Beijing Olympics won’t have to choose between “steamed crap” and “virgin chicken” if Chinese authorities succeed in ridding restaurant menus of mangled English translations.

Weird News Today

Here are a few weird news headlines from around the world.

-A Chinese couple tried to name their baby “@”, claiming the character used in e-mail addresses echoed their love for the child.  The unusual name stands out especially in Chinese, which has no alphabet and instead uses tens of thousands of multi-stroke characters to represent words.

-A U.S. judge appealed his $54 million (27 million pounds) lawsuit on Tuesday against the dry-cleaning shop that misplaced his trousers, shrugging off legal setbacks and international ridicule.

Judge Roy Pearson filed a notice of appeal with the District of Columbia Superior Court, indicating that he won’t abandon the crusade that has turned him into a symbol of America’s lawsuit-happy legal culture.

Pearson asked his neighbourhood dry cleaners to pay him $1,150 when they misplaced a pair of trousers he brought in for a $10.50 alteration in May 2005. The owners of Custom Cleaners said they located the garment a few days later, but Pearson said the pair they offered him was not his.

Claiming that the shop’s “satisfaction guaranteed” sign misled customers who, like him, were dissatisfied with their experience, Pearson sought $1,500 for every day that Custom Cleaners displayed the sign over a four-year period, multiplied by the three members of the Chung family, who owned the business.

He also sought $15,000 to rent a car to take his clothes to another cleaner for 10 years.  Talk about abuse of power, only in the US.

-A South African man shot three weeks ago was told to “walk the pain off” and is still trying to persuade hospitals to remove the bullet lodged in his side.

The bullet passed through his elbow and entered his body just above the hip, missed his vital organs and stopped beneath the skin on the opposite side of his body, the Star said.

Mashiane told the paper he was turned away by one private hospital because he could not afford the bills while a public hospital took X-rays and kept him in for observation before patching him up and sending him home with painkillers.  When he returned a doctor told him to “walk the pain off.”

26 Years without Washing?

hair

It has been reported the Mr. Luo of  Chong Qing city in China has not washed his hair for the past 26 years.

“After many failed attempts using regular shampoo, they spent a total of 5 hours and 3 packs of laundry detergent to wash him clean.”

Personally I just don’t think this is possible, the guy would have had head-lice or worse and been forced to clean his hair at some point.  What do you think?

State Department on Borat’s Side

The State department’s annual human rights report criticizes Kazakhstan for taking action against the satirical Web site of Sacha Baron Cohen, creator of the fictional Kazakh journalist in the film “Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan.”

They charged that he was denied a web address from them and they also planted propoganda against him in chat room, monitored his email and purposely slowed down his website for their users.

Borat Rules!

In the Blue Corner…

“People all have a conception in their head of what a pillow fight is all about,” says Don “The Mouth” Lovranski, Case’s co-investor and the big-voiced announcer for the shows.

“When they come to it, though, they see it’s not hot blonds in negligees; the fights are real, and there’s some fun to it. I think that’s what the appeal is.”

Case himself is league commissioner, a role that becomes part caricature once the ring lights brighten and the pillows come out. As the boss, he has to play the heel. Another cohort, Matt Harsant, becomes Matt Patterson, a throwback-style referee complete with a bow-tie and limited patience.

But it’s the fighters that make the show, and they come in all shapes and sizes, with names like Sarah Bellum, the smart one, and Boozy Suzie, who enters the ring with a beer that referee Patterson confiscates with a stern wave of his finger.

Lynn Somnia staggers to the ring in a hospital gown with electrodes dangling, apparently released from her sleep-deprivation chamber.

Top contenders include Betty Clock’er — by day a financial editor and by night a cushion-swinging housewife who brings a plate of cookies to ringside — and Polly Esther, billed as the waitress from hell (“And somebody’s gonna get served!,” The Mouth bellows as she struts toward the ring).

While the personas are all good fun, the action in the ring is real, and as Case is quick to point out, unscripted.

The rules are simple: women only, no lewd behavior, and moves such as leg drops or submission holds are allowed as long as a pillow is used. After that, it’s up to the combatants.

For the fighters, there’s a small stipend, and a chance of fame if the popularity of the league continues to grow. But it’s also a hobby, and maybe even has a therapeutic appeal for players like Polly Esther, who got her snarky waitress persona the hard way, during 20 years of waiting tables.

“All the people I’ve served over the years, the bad customers, the bad tips, Polly doesn’t take it.” she says. “She lashes out. She hates everybody, but she’s not going to leave her job.”

This past weekend, Polly didn’t disappoint, torquing her long arms to deliver punishing pillow blows to Betty Clock’er in a fight to decide who will travel to New York this week to face PFL title holder Champain, an event Case is hoping will give an adrenaline shot to the league’s profile.

The bigger picture involves a TV deal. Case says he has already turned down bids that didn’t offer the mix of attention to the action and characters that he says makes the league more of a draw to the arts community than the mud-wrestling crowd.

The scene this past Friday would seem to bear him out, as the nearly 500 screaming fans looked more like an art-house movie crowd than a boxing audience.

The cheers reach a crescendo as Betty Clock’er fights off Polly Esther’s roundhouse hits, then unleashes a well executed pillow-leg takedown and pins Esther for the three-count. I gotta check this out!